How to deal with Tank slappers

Discussion in 'New To Racing' started by jumpingjupiter, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. jumpingjupiter

    jumpingjupiter New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    I experienced my first stop to stop slapper over the weekend. I have had wobbles on both the track and street before but never a full blown jar the fillings out of your teeth slapper. The whole experience didn't last longer than 2-3 seconds but when your brain is in terror over drive it seemed to take a long time. It was a bad time to realize that I had no idea how to calm down a slapper.

    The only thought I had was 'when in doubt, gas it'. Not sure if gassing worked or if the osilations stopped dispite my 'solution'. But after hammering the throttle the front tire snapped back in line (down to a minor head shake that corrected a second later)

    Yes a steering damper whould help keep you out of trouble but I am more interested in tecnique of what to do to get yourself out of trouble.

    I figured I would ask cause most have had a fair bit of training and heck, some of you are instructors.

    Thanks
    Jupi
     
  2. blkmrkt

    blkmrkt New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Any change in speed is the best way to deal with it.

    Relax your grip on the bars so you aren't trying to control it as much as just let it sort it self out.

    Roll on the throttle or use the rear brake to change speeds. The front brake might not work if the pads have shaken away from the rotors not to mention you don't want to tuck the front end trying to brake while your front tire is sideways.

    I think you dealt with it in the proper manner.
     
  3. Dean

    Dean Just a beer league racer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,779
    Likes Received:
    1
    Apply throttle to lighten the front end and it will come back into line.

    Get a damper to prevent this from happening in the middle of a turn when you cannot apply full throttle to correct it.
     
  4. Dean

    Dean Just a beer league racer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,779
    Likes Received:
    1
    Also, after EVERY slapper, you need to check your front brakes. Usually the oscillations will move the pads back and you will not have any brakes until you pump your lever.
     
  5. Mel

    Mel Manx Addict

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    0
    Excellent point, especially at Mission where the bumpy exit of Turn 9 can turn into tankslappers, with the slow Turn 1 waiting for you at the end of the straight.
     
  6. Bernie32

    Bernie32 Free Highside Demoes

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    steering DAMPER!;) If you're still tweekin' turn up the dial. Get a good one....not one of those 'cosmetic' ones that comes stock with many bikes.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2010
  7. dammyneckhurts

    dammyneckhurts New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is true, long time ago I found out the hard way. Turn 1 - zero front brake.
     
  8. rustysgsxr

    rustysgsxr Rooster

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mel, I would have to say turn 3 is one to watch for tankslappers.
     
  9. Mel

    Mel Manx Addict

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    0
    You absolutely right, Rusty, I found that as well. I now have a steering damper on my bike so hopefully both 3 and 9 should both be smoother.
     
  10. jumpingjupiter

    jumpingjupiter New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not sure what you are trying to say, Bernie. You have to stop being so vague. lol.

    Anyone have suggestions on a good damper?
     
  11. Dean

    Dean Just a beer league racer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,779
    Likes Received:
    1
    generally Ohlins is regarded as one of the best. If you bike allows for it, a linear damper is better to get. However, if your bike doesn't allow for it easily, or you cannot afford it, a rotary damper will also work. Scotts rotary dampers (by Ohlins) are okay, but not really made for road racing. GPR dampers, especially the new version are made for road racing applications. They still need to be rebuilt, usually once per year or at the very outset once every 2 years. Depending on where you buy it from, some places cover the cost of rebuilds for you.

    If you get your GPR from Mspeed, Sean and Marbod cover the cost of the rebuild each year. Rotary dampers are about $450+ and linear are about $650+ locally.
     
  12. Schoey

    Schoey New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    GPR works great!

    .....and never use the front brakes to get out of a tank slapper. The tire is fighting for traction in the first place.
    I'm not going to say I use the best metthod, but I slowly get off the gas until it goes away (if giving more throttle isn't an option). Chopping the throttle puts all the weight up front and can cause a slide to.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2010
  13. Bernie32

    Bernie32 Free Highside Demoes

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    GET ONE... seriously though, I used to have the linear Ohlins but one crash and the rod was bent. The GPR works well and crashes well. As long as you have a receipt they will do free rebuilds (Print off a work off their website) or else it's $25. When I high sided my ZX10 it landed upside down and slid on the damper.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 5, 2010
  14. Simon

    Simon New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nothing wrong with stock, mine just has thicker oil, :D

    But yeah, get one, like others have found, shift your weight and apply the gas and pray.
     

Share This Page